Shared Social Science Outcomes

Students who take courses in the Social Sciences earn credit in the Individuals, Cultures, and Societies (ICS) area of knowledge for the AA degree by

  • understanding major ideas, values, beliefs, and experiences that have shaped human history and cultures
  • understanding the nature of the individual and the relationship between the self and the community
  • understanding the range of methods by which the social sciences study individuals, cultures, and societies.

In particular, students who take classes in Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology learn content and skills that relate to our College's Social Science outcomes:

Citizenship and Social Activism

Students will be able to demonstrate, through college–level oral and written communications, an understanding of the role of citizenship/social activism in the social sciences. Specifically students will be able to:

  1. Apply social science strategies toward eradicating threats to a democratic society and a healthy planet including, but not limited to: militarism, racism, sexism, economic inequality and corporatism.
  2. Evaluate forms of expressive direct action including free speech, demonstration, protest, unionization, and civil disobedience.

Diversity

Students will be able to demonstrate, through college–level oral and written communications, an understanding of personal, institutional, and ideological differences in ethnic, religious, and cultural perspectives, such as class, race, gender, age, sexual orientation, and ability. Specifically students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the value and need for cultural diversity and relativity within and among local and global societies.
  2. Analyze human behavior, problems, or situations from social science, cross-cultural, and global perspectives.
  3. Evaluate how theories, models, and structures within the social sciences have been established and maintained through systems of power and oppression.

Research

Students will be able to demonstrate, through college–level oral and written communications, an understanding of the role of research in the social sciences. Specifically students will be able to:

  1. Implement research methods by proposing and conducting original research through individual and/or group projects.
  2. Evaluate various research methods and theories.

Institutions

Students will be able to demonstrate, through college–level oral and written communications, an understanding of past and present institutional structures, systems, procedures, and policies as they exist across cultures. Specifically students will be able to: Analyze institutional policies and procedures to make informed personal, civic, academic, and/or career decisions.

Technology

Students will be able to demonstrate, through college–level oral and written communications, an understanding of technological skills and processes as they relate to the social sciences. Specifically students will be able to:

  1. Effectively and ethically apply technological skills to inquiry in the social sciences.
  2. Implement technological skills in the creation of information.

Depending on the course taken, Social Science courses meet critical thinking, civic engagement, global learning, and/or intercultural knowledge outcomes for the AA degree, as students

  • explore issues, ideas, phenomena, and artifacts to define problems or to formulate hypotheses
  • analyze evidence to formulate an opinion, identify strategies, develop and implement solutions, evaluate outcomes, and/or draw conclusions
  • promote the quality of life in the civic community through actions that enrich individual lives and benefit the community
  • analyze complex, interdependent national and global systems, and their legacies and implications, in reference to the distribution of global power
  • reflect on how one's position in systems of power affects both local and global communities
  • apply a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts

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