Directory Systems

Directory systems allow you to develop a fairly complex Web site with many files by dividing the files into directories and sub-directories.

Let's say, you are creating a Web site about one aspect of human needs and its hierarchy, such as shelter, clothes and food, in particular, the hierarchy of foods. For each cell of the table below, we will have a directory and a Web page. The home page is about Foods, and the file name is index.htm file. The index.htm is at the top of the directory in the Web site.

(Only the cells with a colored background have been developed.)

Foods Fruits Apples Macintoshes
Fujis
Bananas  
Peaches  
Vegetables    
Meats    

As shown in the table below, we have a sub-directory for fruits, and it contains a page about fruits (fruits .htm). Under the fruits folder, we have a sub-sub-folder called apples and its page called apple.htm. Under the apples folder, we have a sub-sub-sub folder called macintosh which has a page called macintosh.htm.

The table below is the summary of the directory system. The names in bold are directories while names in italic are html files. Study the hierarchy of the directory system below for a minute.

foods

index.htm

fruits

fruite.htm

apples

apple.htm

macintosh

macintosh.htm

fujis
bananas  

peaches

peach.htm

 
vegetables    
meats    

Click here to go to index.htm, the home page of the site. Continue on to the linked pages, and see how the address on the address box of your browser changes. Think about the structure of the site in terms of a directory system and location of the html files. Also open the HTML code of each page in Notepad (from Internet Explorer, View Source)

Here is the site map.